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DESIGN CONTRACTING

SHOU-SUGİ-BAN

The term ‘’Shou-Sugi-Ban” is Japanese word (焼杉板) and literally translates to “burnt cedar board”.The term is commonly used to describe the centuries old Japanese technique of charring “Sugi” (cedar) planks used for residential siding, fencing, and decking projects.Also it may called ‘’Yakisugi’’ means grilled ceddar . Traditionally, Sugi, (Cryptomeria japonica or Cupressus japonica L.f.) commonly called Japanese cedar, was used. It is still a popular tradition in the Okayama Prefecture of Japan. Nowadays, designers and architects use other species of wood like western red cedar, douglas fir, cyprus pine and oak. Basicly the process involves charring the wood, cooling it, cleaning it, and finishing it with a natural oil. , it can last 80 to 100 years without maintenance, and much longer if it is refinished with oil every 10 to 15 years.They call it “a natural, non-toxic way to preserve wood;” although its manufacture does involve fossil fuels in the modern method of manufacture and a lot of particulates in the traditional technique.

                                

 

Originally, Japanese carpenters looking for an artistic and unique finish that also improved durability used recovered driftwood from the coastlines of Japan. Because of the weathering process wood undergoes when it is subjected to the harsh environment of saltwater, surf, and sun, Japanese driftwood was prized for its unique appearance and durability in many different carpentry mediums. Driftwood that had undergone the appropriate weathering process was in short supply while demand in Japan for such a product was high. So the Japanese turned to another weathering process to achieve the durability and aesthetic. Fire in this case provided the preservative, and the unique and artistic dimension Japanese homeowners and craftsman were looking for.

                                                               

The practice of charring Sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) commonly referred to in the United States as Japanese Cedar has been commonplace in Japan since at least the 1700s, and likely earlier. In the last 50-100 years the practice has fallen out of favor in Japan due to the advent of modern plastic or cement based siding, decking, and fencing. Additionally, wood in Japan has been in short supply for quite a while, and most wood has to be imported, increasing its cost. These factors caused Shou Sugi Ban to become a “lost” technique.

 

In the early 2000′s, Shou Sugi Ban was “rediscovered,” first in Japan, but then it quickly gained the attention of architects and designers in Europe and North America, and started showing up in custom designed houses and buildings. In the last few years its use has really exploded, for all the same reasons that it was popular in Japan hundreds of years ago.

 Micheal  James Moran               *Custom made by Michael Wilson 

They call it “a natural, non-toxic way to preserve wood;” although its manufacture does involve fossil fuels in the modern method of manufacture and a lot of particulates in the traditional technique.

This is how it is made in Japan, no fossil fuels required, but a lot slower.

In design world, it is mostly made by using a blowtorch.

Now MAGRE is rewarded a CHARCOZA restaurant in Riyadh /S.Arabia. Most of the Wall claddings and table tops are going to be done with Shou Sugi Ban . MAGRE design&contracting  is a pioneer design brand in Turkey and Middle East that does this sofisticated decoration style. MAGRE follows newest trends in the World. You can  follow our web site www.magre.com.tr   to see the progress of the work.